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London's Hidden Horologists

The city lost in time

 

KEN KESSLER    FULL ARTICLE    12/16/14

Moon-phase indication might have been useful before computing turned celestial observation into a precise science. Now, moon phase is an indulgence; so, too, the current darling of the complications fanatic: astronomical functions, especially sidereal-time indication.

 

Of use primarily to navigators in the pre-GPS era and, today, to astronomers aligning telescopes, sidereal time is analogous to the true motion of the earth relative to the stars. Our clocks, watches and phones tell time that corresponds to a man-made “mean” (as in Greenwich Mean Time), with noon-to-noon precisely 24 hours apart, also known as mean solar time. A sidereal day’s duration is 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds. This is how long it takes the Earth to make one rotation.

DURING MUCH OF the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, London was the world center of watch- and clockmaking. It’s true, the English capital once was a horological hothouse.

 

The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers received recognition with a royal charter in 1631, while two watchmakers, Thomas Tompion (1639–1713) and George Graham (1673–1751), were honored by being buried in Westminster Abbey. John Harrison (1693-1776) invented the marine chronometer, ensuring that Great Britain ruled the waves for most of the following two centuries. The watches and clocks of James Cox (1723–1800) were all the rage at the Russian, Chinese and Japanese courts. Today, one can still find old-fashioned horological skills in London; you just need to know where to look.

 

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MICHAEL CLERIZO   FULL ARTICLE    12/14/14

 

[member news]

Horologist Moving Business to the Internet

THE RIDGEFIELD PRESS     FULL ARTICLE

After 36 years of keeping clocks ticking on Main Street,

the Horologist of London will be moving with the times and continuing the business on the Internet through its website, horologistoflondon.com

 

Gerald Grunsell, fellow of the British Horological Institute, came to America in 1972 and in 1978 opened the Horologist of London on Main Street, specializing in purchasing, restoring, repairing, and selling  antique clocks and scientific instruments.

 

He has restored, repaired, shipped, set up, and maintained clocks from Maine to Florida and California, and will continue to do so.

 

Clocks will continue to be available for purchase through the website, and as always, they will be delivered to the customer’s house to see how they look in place prior to approval. Repairs will still be offered through the website as well.

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