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Teak and Bamboo: Analog Watch Co.’s

Carpenter Collection Review

by Keith Lehman

Photo by Keith Lehman.

“Study Nature, love Nature, stay close to Nature.

It will never fail you.”  -Frank Lloyd Wright

Photo by Keith Lehman at the National Watch & Clock Museum. Background: Wall Clock 1994 (all wooden movement) by James Borden

Photo by Keith Lehman at the National Watch & Clock Museum. Background:
P.R. Stauffer Tower Clock ca 1676.

Teak and Bamboo or Makore and Red Sanders?

 

Donated to the National Watch and Clock Museum by the Analog Watch Co. from its Carpenter Collection Series, these two wood encased watches were true beauties that presented a difficult yet delightful choice. Which one to wear and review?

 

Although plantations can be found as far away as Equatorial Africa, teak is harvested primarily out of Indonesia and has been used by empires for more than 2,000 years as a nautical expansion to their commercial, cultural, and military ambitions.

 

Bamboo, which is actually a tall growing grass, is simply amazing. Fast growing, nutritious, stronger than brick and concrete, and rivaling the strength of steel with medicinal properties, this plant not only represents Asian infrastructure but also Asian philosophy and aesthetic principles. To me this watch represents not only uniqueness but appreciation, strength, and versatility.

 

As a nemophilist (someone who loves forests and woods) and a budding watch collector, there is a lot to like about this watch. The watch is definitely a good conversation starter. I got many positive comments from men and women and even enjoyed a few prolonged conversations about it. It’s comfortable to wear, lightweight, and pleasing to look at. Because the movement is Japanese quartz, it’s naturally accurate and also affordable at a retail price of $150 plus tax.

 

Another of my favorite—and unexpected—facets of the watch is its highly reflective crystal. Because wood is nonreflective to light, I was concerned that the watch’s case and dial would lack the shininess of metal. However, the large crystal and gold hands handsomely reflect light, making it an even more admirable piece, especially in the daytime.

 

“To me this watch represents not only uniqueness but appreciation, strength, and versatility.”

 

I recommend these watches to anyone who loves nature, woodworking, or wearing something unique. For the ecologically inclined, the watches are 80 percent biodegradable and a tree is planted for every purchase. My only thought is that because Analog Watch Co. is so focused on the ecologically beneficial qualities of these watches, perhaps it can provide a model with a nonleather strap to appease its animal-loving audience. Although the retail price would most likely be raised if the watch was mechanical, there would be no need for a battery or recycling
the battery.

 

Frank Lloyd Wright said, “Study Nature, love Nature, stay close to Nature. It will never fail you.” Wearing a piece from the Carpenter Collection is definitely a gesture of appreciation for the natural world, but it’s also a reminder of our connection and ultimate dependence upon it.

 

More information can be found at http://analogwatchco.com/wood-watches/.

 

 

Photo by Keith Lehman.

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